• Quote of the Day
    "For most people, transformation is slow. It happens without you realizing it."
    Marsha Linehan, posted by Daniel

Daniel

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Introjection, one of many defense mechanisms posited by Sigmund Freud, occurs when a person internalizes the ideas or voices of other people. This behavior is commonly associated with the internalization of external authority, particularly that of parents.

Introjection may lead individuals to pay an inordinate amount of attention to the beliefs of others rather than their own personal needs.
 

Daniel

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From a psychoanalytic point of view, rational thinking is not enough to get rid of introjects—it requires psychoanalysis. Why? In psychoanalysis, the negative introjects get projected on the analyst in the transference. Through the process of analyzing the transference, the patient is able to dissolve the introjects and identify with a new, supportive inner voice—the analyst's.
 

David Baxter

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Have you ever tried psychoanalysis, @Daniel?

Really, the evidence for its efficacy in studies over the last few decades has been pretty weak, not to mention that most psychoanalysts still seem to want to aim for multiple sessions a week which can empty your bank account in a hurry. Many insurers will no longer cover psychoanalysis for that reason.
 

Daniel

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The motto for meaning therapy is, “Meaning is all we have; relationship is all we need.” Meaning therapy assumes that when these two essential human needs are met, individuals are more likely to cope better with their predicaments and live a more rewarding life.
 

gooblax

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The motto for meaning therapy is, “Meaning is all we have; relationship is all we need.” Meaning therapy assumes that when these two essential human needs are met, individuals are more likely to cope better with their predicaments and live a more rewarding life.
Reminds me of my (currently not seeing him) counsellor's spiel which is framed as "connection" and "contribution".
 

Daniel

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High-empathy counselors appear to have higher success rates regardless of theoretical orientation. Low-empathy and confrontational counseling, in contrast, has been associated with higher drop-out and relapse rates, weaker therapeutic alliance and less client change.
 

Daniel

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“I want you to get excited about who you are, what you are, what you have, and what can still be for you. I want to inspire you to see that you can go far beyond where you are right now.”

"The family is a microcosm. By knowing how to heal the family, I know how to heal the world."

"What people bring to me in the guise of problems are their ways of living that keep them hampered and pathologically oriented. What we're doing now is seeing how [relationship] education allows us to move toward more joy, more reality, more connectedness, more accomplishment and more opportunities for people to grow."

Virginia Satir
 
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Daniel

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"Psychotherapy gives the now grown child another chance to learn that it is possible to resolve disagreements in a way that is satisfactory to both parties and without causing permanent harm to the relationship."

~ Elinor Greenberg, PhD
 

Daniel

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"Focus should be placed on cross-disorder commonalities in order to realise actionable and translatable results to combat mental health disorders."
 

Daniel

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“Why do we focus so intensely on our problems? What draws us to them? Why are they so attractive? They have the magnet power of love: somehow we desire our problems; we are in love with them much as we want to get rid of them . . . Problems sustain us -- maybe that's why they don't go away. What would a life be without them? Completely tranquilized and loveless . . . There is a secret love hiding in each problem.”

― James Hillman, A Blue Fire
 

Daniel

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“As the ego does not represent the whole psyche, so the Western mind cannot speak for the whole world.”

― James Hillman
 

Daniel

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“When we are told what is healthy we are being told what is right to think and feel. When we are told what is mentally ill we are being told what ideas, behaviour, and fantasies are wrong. [...] The avenues of escape are blocked by the professioal abuse of pathologizing. To refuse the mental health approach confirms one's 'sickness'. One needs 'therapy', [...]

How can we take back therapy [...] from a system which must find illness in order to promote health and which, in order to increase the range of its helping, is obliged to extend the area of sickness. Ever deeper pockets of pathology to be analyzed, ever earlier traumata: primal, prenatal, into my astral body; ever more people into the ritual: the family, the office force, community mental health, analysis for everyone. [...]

Its practice may differ [...] but the premise is the same. The work of making soul requires professional help.
Soul-making has become restricted by therapy and to therapy. And psychopathology has become restricted to therapy's negative definition of it, reduced to its role in the therapy game.”

― James Hillman, Re-Visioning Psychology
 

Daniel

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"Whenever our own truth is denied, ignored or invalidated we experience the greatest fear we can ever know: the threat of the annihilation of our self."

― Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, Against Therapy
 

Daniel

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Eclectic psychotherapy is a form of psychotherapy in which the clinician uses more than one theoretical approach, or multiple sets of techniques, to help with clients' needs. [1][2] The use of different therapeutic approaches will be based on the effectiveness in resolving the patient's problems, rather than the theory behind each therapy.
 

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